Report | Environment Colorado Research & Policy Center

Lighting the Way

Solar energy is on the rise. America has more than three times as much solar photovoltaic capacity today as in 2010, and more than 10 times as much as in 2007. In the first three months of 2013, solar power accounted for nearly half of the new electricity generating capacity in the United States.

Report | Environment Colorado Research & Policy Center

Wind Power for a Cleaner America

America has more than doubled its use of wind power since the beginning of 2008 and we are starting to reap the environmental rewards. Wind energy now displaces about 68 million metric tons of global warming pollution each year—as much as is produced by 13 million cars. And wind energy now saves more than enough water nationwide to meet the needs of a city the size of Boston.

Report | Environment Colorado

Cool Breeze: Less Pollution and More Water Savings from Wind Energy in Colorado

Fossil fuel-fired power plants are major sources of air pollution in Colorado. This air pollution harms our health and contributes to global warming. Fossil fuel power plants also consume significant amounts of the state’s precious water supplies. Wind energy, in contrast, has none of these problems. It produces no air pollution, makes no contribution to global warming, and uses no water.

Report | Environment Colorado Research & Policy Center

Report: The Costs of Fracking

Over the past decade, the oil and gas industry has fused two technologies—hydraulic fracturing and horizontal drilling—to unlock new supplies of fossil fuels in underground rock formations across the United States. “Fracking” has spread rapidly, leaving a trail of contaminated water, polluted air, and marred landscapes in its wake. In fact, a growing body of data indicates that fracking is an environmental and public health disaster in the making.

Report | Environment Colorado

Trashing Our Treasures

National parks, forests and public lands are essential for maintaining healthy ecosystems, safeguarding our waterways, cleaning up the air we breathe, protecting wildlife habitat, and providing opportunities to connect with the outdoors. Recreation and tourism on public lands drives a 10$ billion outdoor industry in Colorado that supports over 100,000 local jobs. This report showcases treasured places across the country at risk of resource exploitation and development if attacks on our public lands are signed into law. Many of the places profiled in this report are ecologically sensitive, pristine areas; all are beloved state treasures that provide extensive recreational opportunities.

Nevertheless, Representatives Tipton, Coffman and Lamborn and support bills that put our wilderness at risk.

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